Assessment Business Center Starts a Forum-Understanding People is the Key!

    A Forum is Now Ready for YOU

Tony posts on this blog site about many different subjects and now he wants to hear from you! He has now created a new forum where you can go to get the help you need for your business!

Go to www.assessmentforum.com and sign up to become a member. There are a variety of groups to join and you can ask the administrator to create a new one, if you have a new subject you would like discussed.

You can share you ideas, ask questions of Tony you always wanted to ask, get tips on what to do with your business concerns and through all this, you will gain a valuable understanding of people which will certainly aid in your future success!

Talking = Understanding = More Success for You!

Tony is ready to help you assess your business, your future and your current path to achieve your dreams. We will be waiting for you at the Forum!

See you at the Forum!

 
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Customer Service Equals The Five Cs

The Five C’s of Effective Execution


The Five C’s of Effective Execution Pay a Key Role in Superior Customer Service. To have mastered these five measures means that you have mastered the way to superior Customer Service which will produce results for your company!

1. Commitment – Across the entire span of people who will be responsible to accomplish any portion of Customer Service Plan. Commitment starts with writing down the goal and the plans necessary to stay on the path to success. Each member of the team must agree on the goal and take ownership of their roles and responsibilities, and get it all in writing!

2. Communication – On a constant basis, communication processes are necessary in order to inform one another what has sales meetings, reporting processes, public charting, etc., and should be designed before the process of execution starts, so everyone knows how to quickly and effectively get the information they need. Communication with your customer, finding out what they want, what they need, is vital to the success of the sale.

3. Collaboration – Several heads are always better than one. Having a collaboration methodology in place that allows team members to make decisions, run meetings, understand responsibilities, etc. is critical to success. Share tips on Customer Service. Decision-making is one of the key differences makers in successful organizations and it makes sense to have a methodology for decision-making that is consistent, time-efficient, and leads to action.

4. Consistency – Having a predictable way of operating together.  People are more successful who have a clearly established set of behavioral guidelines, and making them consistent ensures constant forward motion. Good Customer Service needs a plan and the tools to stick with what works!

5. Constant Awareness (Knowledge) – Making decisions requires knowing exactly where we are with respect to where we said we would be. In today’s competitive world, this is becoming more and more critical to organizations that are trying to integrate a goal-oriented culture. Effective use of technology is how successful companies and teams are creating a real-time knowledge base that allows quick allocation of resources, course correction, and decision-making. Someone needs to be responsible for making a report on a weekly basis on what is working and what is not working in reaching the customer. Knowledge is power and is needed to be passed to each employee who deals with the customers. Superior Customer Service comes from knowledge, teamwork, consistency, communication and commitment!

Teamwork = Superior Customer Service


Personal Space-How close do you let people come?

Personal Space-How Far Do You Think It Is?

An aspect of space that we use to communicate with others is air space around us. We assume that this is our personal territory, much like a private air bubble. We feel a proprietary right to this space and resent others entering it unless they are invited. The exact dimensions of these private bubbles vary from culture to culture, but some generalities can be useful in helping us receive and send messages more clearly through the use of this medium.

How many times have you sat next to a stranger on an airplane or in a movie theater and jockeyed for the single armrest between you? Since touching is definitely a personal space violation in our culture, the more aggressive person who is not afraid of touching someone usually wins the territory.

Research in the field of proxemics has revealed that adult American business people have four basic distances of interaction. These are:

Intimate Zone — ranges from actual physical contact to two feet.
Personal Zone — ranges from approximately two-four feet.
Social Zone — extends from nearly four-twelve feet.
Public Zone — stretches from twelve feet away to the limits of hearing and sight.

People are not necessarily conscious of the importance of maintaining these distances until violations occur. How you feel about people entering these different zones depends upon who they are. You might feel quite uncomfortable and resentful if a business associate entered your Intimate or Personal Zone during a conversation. If the person were your spouse, however, you would probably feel quite good, even if he/ she were so close as to touch you.

People can generally be classified into two major proxemic categories–contact and non-contact. According to author Edward Hall, Americans and Northern Europeans typify the non-contact group due to the small amount of touching that takes place during their transactions. On the other hand, Arabs, Latins, and the Mediterranean countries normally use much contact in their conversations. In addition, although Americans are considered a non-contact group in general, there are obviously significant numbers of Americans who are “contact” people.

When these two major patterns of proxemic behavior meet, their interaction normally ends in a clash. The contact people unknowingly get too close or touch the non-contact people. This leads to discomfort, tension, distrust, and misunderstanding between the two. A commonly used example is that of the South American and North American businesspeople interacting at a cocktail party. For the South American, the appropriate zone for interaction is Personal to Intimate and includes frequent touching to make a point. This is about half the distance minus touch that the North American needs to be in his/her comfortable Social Zone. The South American would step closer, and the North American backward, in a strange proxemic dance until both gave up the relationship as a lost cause because of the other’s “cold” or “pushy” behavior.

Contact and non-contact people have conflicting perceptions of each other based solely on their proxemic behavior. The non-contact people are seen as shy, cold, and impolite by the contact people. On the other hand, non-contact people perceive contact people as pushy, aggressive, and impolite. Often people are bewildered by interactions with other persons displaying different proxemic behaviors. When a proxemic violation occurs, a person generally has a feeling that something is not right but may not be able to focus directly on the cause. Attention usually focuses on the other person and why the other person is not behaving in the “proper” manner. Attention may even be focused on yourself, causing you to become self-conscious. In either case, attention shifts to the behavior of the two transactions and away from the conversation at hand and interferes with effective communication.

Customer Interaction: Do You Hear Me Now?

Telephone Communication: Can you hear me now?

With Cell phones fast out numbering the landlines we use, using them to our advantage may in reality be a disadvantage with our customer interaction objectives. Considering the different ways we use phones these days: to find your significant other when you’re separated in the mall, to keep tabs on the kids, chat with family and friends we may be losing the “formality” and therefore the manners we were taught when using the land line. Keeping a few tips in mind can help.

When answering the phone you use for business, immediately identify your company, department, and your name.

  1. Call your customers by name. Not only will the customer be pleased, but by repeating the name you’re more likely to remember it.
  2. Know yourself and how you sound to others. Record your voice then critique your tone, manners, friendliness, and vocal quality.
  3. Always use the hold button if you must temporarily leave the phone.
  4. Reassure the customer every 20‑30 seconds that you haven’t forgotten him/her when you’ve placed them on hold.
  5. Know your customers. Know how they prefer to be treated. Then deal with them in their preferred mode.
  6. Know your product or service. Your product mastery should shine through.
  7. Keep a note pad and pen handy so you can quickly write messages or notes.
  8. Plan your calls ahead. Try writing a summary of everything you need to know before making the call.
  9. Let the customer hang up first.
  10. Choose your words carefully. On the telephone, your words and vocal quality carry your message.

More Resources From Dr. Tony Alessandra: