Assessments-Why Use Them?

              Why Use Assessments?

We have a crisis brewing in the business world today. We live in a 24/7/365 work world where information moves at lightning speed, and companies want people to work better, faster, smarter. Technology rules, sometimes at the expense of people.

In this high-tech world, people will not feel displaced if they work where they feel comfortable: recognized for their contribution, appreciated for their uniqueness, understood by their peers and listened to by their bosses. They value opportunities for growth and chances to learn from others.

Indeed, surveys across industries have shown that comfort and communication are more important factors to the employee’s perception of well-being than the traditional enticements of compensation, benefits, and other perks.

In a Monster.com world, it has become hugely challenging to find and keep qualified and talented people. The emergence of Web-based job search resources have helped to create a fluid workforce able to constantly search for that next perfect job. According to the International Management Association, average churn rates have jumped by more than 14 percent in the last decade.

When employees experience low levels of comfort and communication, they become frustrated and this usually leads to reduced productivity and a loss of high performers. So how do employers combat this counter productive trend?

Employers can combat this trend by growing their employees’ intellectual wealth. A good way to grow intellectual wealth is with good employee assessment resources. Therefore, employee assessment is a vital tool in the challenge facing today’s businesses to grow intellectual wealth. Assessments can measure a variety of criteria: intellectual ability, achievement motivation, skill proficiency, work styles, personality characteristics, and personal values are among them. Assessments are used to help determine training needs, career counseling and life enrichment.

Assessments are a first step towards personal awareness. We provide those assessments that give employees an opportunity to learn something about themselves, with the goals of self improvement, personality enrichment and enhancement of their relationships with others in mind.

We offer assessment tools where there are no right or wrong answers. Employees participate freely in our assessments because they know they will not pass or fail, just become more intellectually wealthy. A good assessment is a tool designed to increase employees’ awareness of their behavioral tendencies related to how they interact with others. Our assessment systems come with support materials and action plans to help employees implement new strategies and behaviors. Whether their individual career tracks are blue collar/vocational, front line customer service, face-to-face sales, technical/professional services, supervision/management or executive staff/boardroom, it is important for employees to have the skills to demonstrate those attitudes and behaviors that enable them to get along with others. To get along, they must better understand themselves and others to communicate with others effectively.

Here are some ways organizations use assessments:

  • Training & Development – training and learning programs can be individualized to each employee rather than using a “one size fits all” training curriculum.
  • Management Decision Making – good decisions are usually made when managers have good information upon which to base those decisions. Assessments can provide appropriate information for coaching, training and communicating with employees.


Employers who use our assessments recognize that they are powerful resources; and when used as part of a training and development program, they enhance employees’ skills related to communicating effectively. The benefits from using assessments can be profound:

  • Higher employee morale
  • Increased productivity
  • Reduced employee turnover
  • Reduced training costs
  • Increasing employees’ sense of well-being
  • Increasing the bottom line due to better employee service to customers
  • More effective team building and compatibility

For more information about how you can use our assessments in your company, please contact us at: TA@Alessandra.com or call us at +1-760-872-1500

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Can You Adjust?

ADJUSTING TO OTHER PEOPLE’S BEHAVIORAL STYLES

 

 

Use the following suggestions to adapt to other people’s behavioral styles.

 

NEEDS TO KNOW ABOUT:

 Relaters             How it will affect their personal circumstances

 Thinkers           How they can justify it logically / how it works

 Socializers       How it enhances their status and visibility

 Directors           What it does / by when / what it costs

 

DO IT WITH:

Relaters             Warmth

 Thinkers           Accuracy

 Socializers       Flair

 Directors           Conviction

 

SAVE THEM:

Relaters             Conflict

 Thinkers           Embarrassment

 Socializers       Effort

 Directors           Time

 

                             TO FACILITATE DECISION-MAKING PROVIDE:

 Relaters             Personal service and assurances

 Thinkers           Data and documentation

 Socializers       Testimonials and incentives

 Directors           Options with supporting analysis

 

                             LIKES YOU TO BE:

 Relaters             Pleasant

 Thinkers           Precise

 Socializers       Stimulating

 Directors           To the point

 

                             SUPPORT THEIR:

 Relaters             Feelings

 Thinkers           Procedures

 Socializers       Ideas

 Directors           Goals

 

                             CREATE THIS ENVIRONMENT:

 Relaters             Personal

 Thinkers           Serious

 Socializers       Enthusiastic

 Directors           Businesslike

 

                             MAINTAIN THIS PACE:

 Relaters             Slow/ relaxed

 Thinkers           Slow/ systematic

 Socializers       Fast/ spontaneous

 Directors           Fast/ decisive

 

                             FOCUS ON THIS PRIORITY:

 Relaters             The relationship/ communication

Thinkers           The task/ the process

 Socializers       The relationship/ interaction

 Directors           The task/ the results

 

                             AT PLAY BE:

 Relaters             Casual and cooperative

 Thinkers           Structured/ Play by the rules

Socializers       Spontaneous and playful

Directors           Competitive and aggressive

 

                             USE TIME TO:

 Relaters             Develop the relationship

 Thinkers           Ensure accuracy

Socializers       Enjoy the interaction

Directors           Act efficiently

 

                             WRITE THIS WAY:

 Relaters             Warm and friendly

 Thinkers           Detailed and precise

Socializers       Informal and dramatic

Directors           Short and to the point

 

                             ON THE TELEPHONE BE:

 Relaters             Warm and pleasant

 Thinkers           Businesslike and precise

Socializers       Conversational and playful

Directors           Short and to the point

What Behavioral Personality Do You Have?

Maximizing Your Adaptability

 

You remember The Golden Rule: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”? Well, that’s a wonderful axiom, as far as it goes. But not everybody wants to be treated the same way you do!

 

I think the real intent of the Golden Rule is to treat others the way they would like to be treated. Hence, I’ve come up with what I think is a newer, more sensitive version of The Golden Rule-or what I call The Platinum Rule:

 

“DO UNTO OTHERS AS THEY’D LIKE DONE UNTO THEM.”

 

The Platinum Rule, distilled to its essence, equates to respect for others. It’s an attempt to break down the them-versus-us mentality and concentrate on the “us.” It’s a potent tool for helping build rapport by meeting the other person’s needs and your own.

 

In fact, along with behavioral scientist Dr. Michael J. O’Connor, I wrote a book that examined the personality styles much more deeply. The Platinum Rule (Warner Books, 1996) describes four core behavioral, or personality, types:

 

Directors are forceful, take-charge people. Their impatience-and sometimes their insensitivity-may make you wince. Driven by an inner need to get results, they’re more concerned with outcomes than egos.

 

The friendly, enthusiastic Socializers are fast-paced people who thrive on admiration, acknowledgment, and applause. They love to talk, and while strong on fresh concepts, they’re usually weak on execution.

 

Relaters are the teddy bears of the human zoo. Rather easygoing, people-oriented, and slow-paced, Relaters tend to drag their feet when it comes to change, preferring routine ways of doing things.

 

Thinkers are results-oriented problem solvers. They seek results in a quiet, low-key way. Thinkers are analytical, persistent, independent, and well organized, but often seen as aloof, picky, and critical.

 

Here are some added tips to help you practice adaptability

 

1. Reach out and touch someone. Think of a “difficult” person with whom you’d like to communicate better. What motivates that person? For a Director, it’s control; for a Socializer, recognition; for a Relater, camaraderie; and for a Thinker, analysis. What can you do that will reinforce what this person needs most?

 

2. Don’t be too quick to judge. Being able to recognize the styles is important, but be careful about judging someone’s style too quickly and making irrevocable decisions based on your perceived compatibility. Your knowledge of the styles should expand your relationships, not limit them. So don’t use The Platinum Rule to stereotype or pigeonhole others.

 

3. Use self-knowledge as an insight, not an excuse. By knowing your style, you’ll see your strengths and weaknesses as others do. But don’t use this as a crutch to justify unacceptable behavior, thinking thoughts like, “I’m a Director. So I’m naturally impatient and domineering.” Or “It’s okay if I don’t follow up because I’m an Socializer.”

 

4. Learn to motivate by style. Whenever you face a task-at the office or in the home-it’s likely that a big chunk of your effort involves attempting to motivate others. You can use your knowledge of The Platinum Rule to inspire each style:

Directors: Be straightforward: Here’s what’s wrong, here’s how it came about, here’s how it’s likely to affect us.

Socializers: Explain that while meeting this challenge may be difficult, it’ll also distinguish those who do.

Relaters: Support their reluctance toward change, see if it’s had a negative impact on them, and work with them to remedy that.

Thinkers: They want to know the reasons behind the change. So be organized, thorough, and precise and provide documentation of any new plan.

 

5. Tailor your criticism by style. Telling someone they need to improve is difficult but often necessary at work and at home. Here are some possible approaches:

Directors: Stress the result wanted and let them come up with ways to achieve it.

Socializers:  Don’t be vague. Have the Socializer repeat the agreed-upon changes back to you so there’s no chance of miscommunication.

Relaters: Focus on performance, not personality. Go out of your way to explain that there’s nothing wrong with them personally.

Thinkers: Be specific. Say precisely what’s being done wrong, outline the steps for correcting it, and set a deadline for completion.