Want To Do A Memory Exercise?

Visualization and Memory Exercise

 

It’s important to exercise your ability to create mental images to help improve your memory. Visualization is a primary technique for storing information in your memory.  So here’s a fun exercise with some mental image gymnastics.

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Get a mental picture of a two-inch cube.

Paint the top of the cube red.

Paint the bottom blue.

Paint the remaining sides white.

Now slice the cube vertically in half.

Then slice it vertically in half again at a right angle to the first cut.

Now, cut the cube in half horizontally, like a layer cake.

You now have divided the two-inch cube into a number of one-inch cubes.

Memory Test


 

Can you answer the following questions (answers at the end)?

A: How many sides does each one-inch cube have?

B: How many one-inch cubes are there?

C: How many one-inch cubes have at least one white side?

D: How many cubes have at least one red side and at least one white side?

E: How many unpainted sides does each one-inch cube have?

 

How did you do?

This exercise tested your ability to construct and manipulate mental images. Even though this was a relatively easy exercise in terms of complexity, it required a high level of concentration in listening to the directions. I recommend that you practice similar visualization exercises to keep your mental imaging muscles in good shape.

 

Answers: A=6; B=8; C=8; D=4; E=3

Well, how did you do? Let us know in your comments!

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Do You Have Street Smarts?

 

THE ELEMENTS OF STREET SMARTS

 

I. Heightened Awareness

  1. Trust your intuition
  2. Develop perceptiveness and ability to anticipate
  3. Size up people quickly and accurately
  4. See the big picture

II. CONFIDENCE

  1. Fake it till you make it
  2. Use chutzpa when necessary
  3. Believe in yourself-Be confident

III. HEALTHY SKEPTICISM

  1. Don’t believe everything you see and hear
  2. Be hard to take advantage of
  3. Use your “mental categories” and generalizations to keep you on guard
  4. Give people the time and rope to either hang themselves or prove their integrity/sincerity

IV. RESOURCEFULNESS

  1. Think quickly on your feet
  2. Be persistent
  3. Be prepared
  4. Be flexible
  5. Change your surroundings or adapt
  6. Surround yourself with experts & contacts

V. RISK-TAKING

  1. Be willing to take risks
  2. Minimize the possible down side
  3. Cut your losses and get out if you’re wrong
  4. Learn by your mistakes Use your STREET SMARTS and you will be a winner in whatever path you take! Please comment in this blog on how you feel STREET SMARTS have helped you in your life!

ADAPTABILITY-AN IMPORTANT ASSET TO FURTHER YOUR CAREER GOALS

ADAPTABILITY

 

Adaptability is your willingness and ability to behave in ways that are not necessarily characteristic of your style in order to deal effectively with the requirements of a situation or relationship.   Adaptable people make the choice to go beyond their own comfort zones so others feel more comfortable. 

 

With adaptability, you can treat people the way they want to be treated. You practice adaptability every time you slow down with another person who does not feel as comfortable moving as fast as you do. You also practice adaptability when you take time to listen to a personal story from another person, rather than getting right down to the task at hand.

Adaptability is important because people are different and need to be treated differently. You develop open and honest relationships with others by being tactful, reasonable, and understanding.

Do you have a story to share about what you have had to do to show adaptability in your work area? Let me know in a comment what has happened to you! Let’s share and help each other.

 

Do Clothes REALLY Make the Man?

Make your wardrobe work for you

 

Often we acquire our clothes haphazardly—a sale item or an impulse buy here, a Christmas gift there—without much thought as to how they fit our image, or even if they match each other. In fact, you’ve probably seen folks who’ve expanded their wardrobe only to hobble themselves by wearing a plaid shirt with a striped tie, or to go overboard with jewelry that clatters and clangs when they walk. In other words, unless you know how to put it all together, you can improve your wardrobe but still project a poor image. So make sure your colors, patterns, and accessories are complementary, not clashing.

Most of us have at least one or two outfits that make us feel especially good when we’re wearing them. We tend to save those for special occasions. But why not try to increase that number to three, four, or more such outfits and, thus, try to make a particularly good impression every day? 

If you’re vague about what you look best in, consult a friend or co-worker whose taste you admire, or go to a wardrobe consultant. They often spot things that you’d look good in but probably wouldn’t consider trying on.

A wardrobe consultant may sound like a costly luxury. But many times their advice is free if you buy clothes from them, and some will even shop for you at an hourly rate, which can save a lot of time. Combine that time savings with greater selection and the likelihood of a superb fit, and it all may add up to a terrific value.

Tell us if you have had a time when clothes, not necessarily the most expensive, but the right fit and look, have made a difference for you! Comment and let us know!


 

Interruptions-How good are you are dealing with them?

Learn to manage interruptions

Managers are especially torn by trying to be both accessible and productive. They want to be modern, sensitive bosses who will hear out customer complaints and employee problems—but they also have planning to do, projects to complete, paperwork to handle, goals to meet, and higher-ups to satisfy.

Here are some techniques for striking a balance:

•           The telephone, Alec Mackenzie suggests, is one of the biggest time wasters. He gives several strategies for dealing with interrupting phone calls, such as call screening, voice mail, and the like. But perhaps the simplest solution is to put a three-minute egg timer on your desk. When the sand runs out, you know to call a halt diplomatically to all but the most critical of calls.

•           An open-door policy is fine, but it can destroy your efficiency if taken too far. Roger Dawson, in 13 Secrets of Power Performance, offers numerous ways to lessen drop-in visitors. One, arrange your office so you aren’t readily visible and thus a target for people passing by with time on their hands. Another, set a block of time—usually early in the workday or near the end—when employees do a lot of socializing, and make that your official “closed-door” period when you can hole up and not feel guilty.

•           Go to lunch at an odd hour, say 11 a.m. or 1 p.m. Not only, Dawson believes, will you get a better table and service at the restaurant, you’ll be working when everyone else is out to lunch. Thus, your productivity will soar

 

Dr. Tony wants to know how you cope with interruptions. Comment on this blog and let us know your way of dealing with them.

Where does YOUR time go?

                                                                              Stop, Look and Write It Down                                     

       If you think you’re too busy to figure out exactly where your time goes, then you’re precisely the person who should compile a detailed time log.

Hands tied because of loss of focus?

 

So for at least three days, or better yet for a week, keep close track of how you spend your days—how many total minutes on important and unimportant phone calls, how many minutes studying papers or restudying papers you’ve already read, how much time socializing, planning, daydreaming, being interrupted, and making significant headway. When you look at your list, let me hear your questions under the comment section. Maybe we can help you FIND the time to do what you need to do and want to do!

 

 

 

Then figure out where you’re wasting your time in relation to your priorities. Being too busy to come to grips with time management is like putting off getting your roof repaired because it’s the rainy season.